Archive for the 'Recipe' Category

Knuckle & Claw – Los Angeles (Silver Lake)

Knuckle & Claw - Los Angeles - Silver Lake

In a devastating turn of events, I traveled to Boston two weeks ago and did not consume a lick of seafood while in town. It seems that I’ve officially transitioned to the part in my life where family time takes precedence over food-centric pursuits. Well, I guess this is growing up

Knuckle & Claw - Los Angeles - Silver Lake

Needless to say, I was totally craving a lobster roll as soon as my feet touched down on Southland soil, so I made my way to Chloe Dahl and Nikki Booth’s Knuckle & Claw just as soon as I could.

Opened this past March, the Sunset Boulevard eatery serves up classic New England fare using Maine lobster that’s flown in daily. The menu is super-simple and highly-specialized; it’s my kind of place.

Knuckle & Claw - Los Angeles - Silver Lake

The Astronomer, June, and I shared the shrimp ($5), blue crab ($6), and lobster ($9) mini rolls, as well as the grilled cheese ($8) and a cup o’ soup ($8), on our visit.

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Fresh Fig Galette

Fresh Fig Galette

It’s fig season. Hooray! In celebration of this most joyous time of year, I baked a Fresh Fig Galette. The figs, Black Mission and Kadota, arrived at my doorstep from Farm Fresh to You, a fantastic new-to-me service that brings local and organically grown produce to homes and offices across Southern California. Pro Tip: Use code CATH3482 for $10 off your first order. You’ll love it, I promise.

Farm Fresh to You Delivery

Whereas most Fresh Fig Galette recipes call for for a layer of jam, cream, or marzipan between the fruit and crust, this recipe from Cooking Light only requires the essentials. Simple is best when it comes to highlighting the season’s finest and ripest.

Whereas the Black Missions tasted wonderfully earthy, the Kadotas were juicy and sweet. Together, they made for an irresistibly jammy filling. The crust, made from a combination of all-purpose flour and ground almonds, came together in rich and crumbly fashion, like a fine shortbread.

Figs will only be around from now until early fall, so hurry up and bake this galette before this much-too-short season comes to an end. What are you waiting for?

  • 6.75 ounces unbleached all-purpose flour (about 1 cup)
  • 4 1/2 tablespoons almond meal (Note: Almond meal is finely ground almonds)
  • 2 tablespoons sugar, divided
  • 3/8 teaspoon salt
  • 7 tablespoons cold unsalted butter, cubed
  • 3 tablespoons canola oil
  • 3 tablespoons ice water
  • 1 pound fresh Black Mission and/or Kadota figs, stemmed and quartered lengthwise
  • 2 teaspoons lemon juice

Fresh Fig Galette

Weigh or lightly spoon flour into a dry measuring cup; level with a knife. Place flour, almond meal, 1 tablespoon sugar, and salt in a food processor; pulse to combine. Scatter butter into processor; pulse until mixture resembles coarse meal. Drizzle in oil; pulse to combine. Add ice water; pulse just until combined. Turn mixture out onto a sheet of plastic wrap; pat into a disk. Continue reading ‘Fresh Fig Galette’

Christina Tosi’s Grandma’s Oatmeal Cookies

Milk Life | Grandma's Oatmeal Cookies

“This cookie is the reason I learned to bake,” writes pastry superstar Christina Tosi in her latest book, Milk Bar Life. If you’ve ever tasted any of her daring and delicious Momofuku Milk Bar creations (See: Crack Pie! Confetti Cookies! Salty Cucumber Soft Serve!), then you’ll understand that this is a very bold statement.

While The Astronomer and June were on a long walk last weekend, I dusted off my Kitchen Aid and got to baking these life-altering cookies. Aside from having to bring the butter to room temperature, this recipe is as low maintenance (and fast!) as they come. Butter and two kinds of sugar are creamed until fluffy, eggs and vanilla are added in, then finally, the “dry” ingredients are incorporated just so.

Following 10 minutes in the oven, Grandma’s Oatmeal Cookies baked up crispy along the edges and moist throughout. The combination of rolled oats and sweetened shredded coconut brought a double punch of flavor and texture, while a good hit of salt kept all sweetness in check.

While these cookies are certainly solid as is, the batter is an excellent base for a more complex cookie. Classic oatmeal cookie add-ins like dried fruit, chocolate chips, and nuts would work great here, or more Tosi-esque ingredients like popcorn, potato chips, and pretzels. Go crazy because Christina Tosi would definitely approve.

  • 14 tablespoons (1 3/4 sticks) unsalted butter, at room temperature
  • 3/4 cup packed light brown sugar
  • 2/3 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 large eggs
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 1/4 cups old-fashioned oats
  • 1 1/4 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • 1 1/4 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 cup sweetened shredded coconut (optional)
  • 1 cup confectioners’ sugar

Milk Life | Grandma's Oatmeal Cookies

Heat the oven to 375°F.

Combine the butter, brown sugar, and granulated sugar in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment on high and cream together until light and fluffy, about 3 minutes.

Milk Life | Grandma's Oatmeal Cookies

Add the eggs and vanilla and mix until incorporated, about 1 minute.

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Cháo Cá – Vietnamese Fish Porridge

Chao Ca - Vietnamese Fish Porridge

I called dibs on the fish carcass following our baked catfish feast at Phong Dinh. While little was left of the fish’s flesh, I saw great potential in the remaining bones. Namely, an opportunity to transform what would have been waste into one of the most comforting dishes ever: cháo cá (Vietnamese fish porridge).

To start, I made a light stock using the bones along with fresh ginger, scallions, and cilantro. According to Mom, the aromatics are essential for balancing the fish’s intrinsically “fishy” flavor and aroma. Next, I added rice to the broth and let it simmer for the better part of an hour. Once the rice was fully bloomed, thickening the porridge just so, sautéed fish and mushrooms were added in. Chopped cilantro and scallions topped each bowl to finish.

Even though cháo cá  is essentially made with kitchen scraps, the flavor coaxed from the humble ingredients is rounded and rich. It’s hard not to feel utterly satisfied after finishing a bowl of this soulful porridge.

  • 1 large fish carcass, with any remaining flesh removed and set aside
  • Water
  • 1 bunch cilantro
  • Small knob ginger (1.5 inches long), peeled and thinly sliced
  • 1 bunch scallions, white and green parts separated
  • Salt
  • Fish sauce
  • 1 1/2 cups Jasmine rice, rinsed and drained
  • 1/2 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 8 ounces white button mushrooms, rinsed and quartered
  • Chili powder (optional)

Make broth

Chao Ca - Vietnamese Fish Porridge

In a large stock pot, combine 4 quarts of water, fish carcass, cilantro (stems only), ginger, and half of the scallions (white part only, halved lengthwise). Bring to a boil, then simmer for 30 minutes on low heat.

Remove broth from heat and discard fish carcass and aromatics. Season with 1 tablespoon salt and 3 tablespoons fish sauce.

Make porridge

Chao Ca - Vietnamese Fish Porridge

Over medium-low heat, return the broth to the stove and add in rice. Simmer until desired thickness has been achieved, approximately 45 minutes to 1 hour.

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