Archive for the 'Recipe' Category

Huckleberry’s Cherry Tomato-Goat Cheese Cobbler

Cherry Tomato-Goat Cheese Cobbler

Not last weekend but the weekend before, I attended the most spectacular brunch hosted by Zoe Nathan, Josh Loeb, and Laurel Almerinda to celebrate the release of their brand-new cookbook, Huckleberry.

Huckleberry Cookbook Brunch with Zoe Nathan Loeb

Inspired by their Santa Monica cafe and bakery, Huckleberry celebrates the bounty of breakfast. From pancakes to teacakes to muffins and egg-topped plates, this beautiful book has mornings covered (and then some).

Huckleberry Cookbook Lunch

Rather than host a traditional book talk and signing, Zoe, Josh, and Laurel dazzled a slew of Los Angeles’ food writers with a seemingly endless parade of made-from-scratch delights from their cookbook. The spread was nothing short of brilliant, and I probably ate enough for triplets!

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St. John’s Rhubarb Crumble Cake

Fergus Henderson's Rhubarb Crumble Cake

The Astronomer and I celebrated another year of marriage this past April, and I’ve been meaning to crank out this post since then. Life can feel hectic these days both on the personal and professional fronts, but there’s always time for cakes and milestones—Always!

Since it’s tradition to bestow fruit upon one’s beloved in honor of the fourth wedding anniversary, I baked my guy a Rhubarb Crumble Cake. He can’t resist tart rhubarb paired with a good streusel topping, and I’m always up for a culinary challenge.

This cake, which is seasonally served at Chef Fergus Henderson’s super-fabulous St. John Restaurant in London, is a triple threat. The bottom-most layer, moist and buttery cake, gives way to a generous layer of tangy fruit kissed with orange zest. Finally, a nutty topping that’s crunchy and wholly complementary ties all the layers together. This is certainly “a kind of British cooking” that I can get behind.

For fruit mixture

  • 3 large stalks of rhubarb
  • 1/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/4 cup Turbinado sugar
  • Grated zest of 1 orange
    NOTE: You could also use apples, apricots, cooked quinces, nectarines, gooseberries, pears and ginger, or plums

For cake mix

  • 1/2 cup soft unsalted butter
  • Scant 2/3 cup granulated sugar
  • 3 large eggs, lightly beaten
  • 1 1/3 cups self-rising flour, sifted
  • Scant 1/4 cup full-fat milk

For crumble mix

  • 1 cup all purpose flour
  • 3 ouces unsalted butter, cut into small cubes
  • 1/2 Turbinado sugar
  • 1/4 cup ground almonds
  • 1/4 cup sliced almonds
  • A pinch of salt

Fergus Henderson's Rhubarb Crumble Cake

First top and tail the rhubarb, give it a good wash and cut it into slices about 3/4 inch thick. Mix it with the sugars and the orange zest and set aside for 30 minutes.

Fergus Henderson's Rhubarb Crumble Cake

For the cake mix, cream the butter and sugar together until light and fluffy. Gradually add the beaten eggs, bit by bit to prevent curdling. Then fold in the sifted flour, and last of all mix in the milk. Put to one side.

For the crumble mix, sift the flour into a bowl, add the butter and rub them together with your fingertips until they look like large breadcrumbs. Stir in the Turbinado sugar, ground almonds, sliced almonds and salt.  Continue reading ‘St. John’s Rhubarb Crumble Cake’

French-style Hot Chocolate

French Hot Chocolate (a Chaplin Christmas Tradition)

Instead of spending Christmas Day in Birmingham like we usually do, The Astronomer and I are rendezvousing with the Chaplins in Charleston, South Carolina. As much as I love Alabama, I am very excited about our holiday destination.

I was inspired this past weekend to make a trio of Chaplin Christmas favorites since we’ll be exploring Charleston’s culinary scene rather than eating at home this year.

Between The Astronomer and me, we whipped up a big pot of oyster and wild rice bisque, a batch of molasses spice cookies, and best of all, enough French-style hot chocolate to take us well into 2014.

“Here’s the Christmas elixir—for soul chill, fat deprivation, or ordinary happiness deficit,” wrote my mother-in-law when she emailed me the recipe last week.

This recipe for “Authentic French Chocolate” comes from Eat, Drink, and be Chinaberry, a cookbook first published in 1996 that’s a staple in The Astronomer’s mother’s collection. One of the book’s contributors’ father brought this recipe home following his time in France during World War II.

What’s really special about this hot chocolate is its light and frothy texture and incredibly rich profile—the result of melted bittersweet chocolate swimming in a sea of whipped cream. Dolloped generously into a mug of warmed milk and sipped (or maybe even slurped), it’s like no other hot chocolate I’ve ever experienced.

It’s starting to feel a lot like Christmas ’round here.

  • 5 ounces semi sweet chocolate
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 1/2 cups sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 2 cups heavy cream
  • Milk, to serve

French Hot Chocolate (a Chaplin Christmas Tradition)

Begin by finely chopping the chocolate.

French Hot Chocolate (a Chaplin Christmas Tradition)

In a small sauce pan, combine the chocolate and water and melt over medium heat. When the chocolate has completely melted, add the sugar and salt, whisking to incorporate. Cook for four minutes and remove from heat. Add the vanilla and cool to room temperature.

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Pumpkin Cupcakes with Cream Cheese Frosting

Spiced Pumpkin Cupcakes with Cream Cheese Frosting

I’ve been cooking and baking up a (quiet) storm these past couple of months, but haven’t shared too many recipes due to the sheer volume of restaurant and travel coverage that needs to be written before the Year in Delicious. It still hasn’t quite sunk in yet that 2014 is literally around the corner.

Since the founding spirit of Eat My Blog was to bring to life the stuff of food porn dreams, it feels appropriate to take a break from my usual material and introduce an exquisite dessert instead.

This recipe for Pumpkin Cupcakes with Cream Cheese Frosting, which I adapted from The Food Librarian who adapted it from Kitchen Runway who adapted it from Paula Deen, was originally meant to be a sheet cake. Sheet cakes are terrific for feeding a crowd, but Eat My Blog demands a more portable, adorable, and affordable sweet!

Even though Paula Deen sucks, this recipe totally and completely rules. In fact, I’ve made it twice in the past two months and plan on doing so a few more times before pumpkin season comes to a close and peppermint reigns supreme.

The cake’s texture is awesomely moist, with a nice and springy crumb. The frosting is rich yet tangy, thanks to a squeeze of fresh lemon juice. I’ve baked a lot of cakes over the years and have never been as pleased with the results as I was with this recipe. It’s the best thing I’ve ever baked.

Say you’ll eat my blog?

For cupcakes

  • 4 large eggs
  • 1 1/2 cups (300 grams) sugar
  • 1 cup (200 grams) canola oil
  • 15 ounces pumpkin puree (not pumpkin pie mix)
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 2 cups (280 grams) all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons cinnamon
  • 1/2 tablespoon nutmeg
  • 1 teaspoon salt

For frosting:

  • 8 ounces cream cheese, room temperature
  • 1/2 cup (1 stick) butter, room temperature
  • 2 cups (6 ounces) sifted powdered sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice

Make cupcakes

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Line two 12-cup muffin pans with cupcake liners.

Spiced Pumpkin Cupcakes with Cream Cheese Frosting

In a large bowl, whisk together the eggs, sugar, oil, pumpkin puree, and vanilla.

Spiced Pumpkin Cupcakes with Cream Cheese Frosting

In a medium bowl, mix together the flour, baking powder & soda, spices, and salt. Slowly add the flour mixture into the pumpkin. Stir to combine until completely blended.

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